Maternity Care Services

From all of us at Banner – University Family Care/AHCCCS Complete Care (B – UFC/ACC), congratulations on your pregnancy!

This is an exciting time for you and your family. We want you and your baby to be as healthy as possible. Your baby is more likely to be healthy if you take care of yourself during your pregnancy. Please call our Customer Care Center at (800) 582-8686, TTY users, please call 711 for help.

We are available Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. We can help you find a doctor, make an appointment, and arrange a ride to your medical appointments. We can also refer you to a member of our Maternal Child Health Department staff if you have questions or would like a nurse care manager to follow up with you throughout your pregnancy.


Preventative and Well Care Services

Female members have direct access to preventative and well care services from a Primary Care Provider or a Gynecologist within the Contractor’s network without the need for a referral.
Maternity care services include, but are not limited to:

  • Identification of pregnancy
  • Medically necessary prenatal services
  • Treatment of pregnancy related conditions
  • Labor and delivery services
  • Postpartum care
  • Related services such as outreach, education, and family planning services

MAT and SUD Services & Resources

Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) is the use of medications, in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies, to provide a “whole-patient” approach to the treatment of substance use disorders (SUDs) and prevent opioid overdose. A combination of medication and therapy can successfully treat these disorders, and for some people struggling with addiction, MAT can help sustain recovery. 

The directory below is being made available to support in identifying Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) services for our pregnant and postpartum members.

AHCCCS registered providers by Specialty

These are providers located in the state of Arizona, and these providers may or may not be contracted with all the AHCCCS Managed Care Organizations (MCOs).  Specialty listing of AHCCCS registered providers will appear and the provider’s Name, Specialty, Address and Phone number will be listed. Providers with multiple office locations will be listed under each location.


A Healthy Pregnancy

A healthy pregnancy starts with you...

The best things you can do to help you take care of you and your baby during your pregnancy are:

  • Seeing your doctor as soon as you think you are pregnant.
  • Going to all of your medical appointments.
  • Taking a prenatal vitamin every day.
  • Getting enough rest.
  • Eating healthy and exercising.
  • Taking care of your mental health.
  • Taking medications your doctor says are safe to take while pregnant.
  • Don’t smoke, drink alcohol, or take any drugs unless prescribed by your doctor.

Visiting Your Doctor

Schedule an appointment with your doctor as early as possible if you think you are pregnant. If you need help choosing a doctor, scheduling an appointment, or getting a ride, please call our Customer Care Center at (800) 582-8686, TTY 711.

View the related information found within our guide, Planning a Healthy Pregnancy:

Nutrition and Exercise

Having good nutrition and staying hydrated can make sure you and your baby are healthy. Your local WIC office can help you and your family with choosing healthy food, provide breastfeeding help, and have a nutrition expert available to answer your questions.

Call WIC at (800) 252-5942 to get started! You can also visit MyPlate.gov for more information on nutrition.

Exercising during pregnancy has been shown to be extremely beneficial. Always talk to your doctor before beginning any exercise program. 

View the related information found within our guide, Planning a Healthy Pregnancy:

Things to Avoid During Pregnancy

Alcohol: No amount of alcohol is considered safe to drink during pregnancy. It’s best not to drink any alcohol while pregnant. If you need help to stop drinking alcohol, talk to your doctor. Or call the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) national helpline at (800) 662-4357.

View the related information found within our guide, Planning a Healthy Pregnancy:

  • Resources to Stop Drinking Alcohol or Taking Drugs     English | Español

Smoking: If you smoke, having a baby might be the motivation you need to quit. Talk to your doctor about quitting or call ASHLine, a free service available to help you quit smoking, at 1-800-55-66-222. You can also text “NO SMOKE” to 74097 to enroll with ASHline.

Recreational Drugs: Pregnant women who use opioids or other non-prescribed drugs may be placing their unborn babies at risk for premature birth, poor growth, birth defects, and behavior and learning problems. If you need help to stop using recreational drugs, talk to your doctor. Or call the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) national helpline at (800) 662-4357.

View the related information found within our guide, Planning a Healthy Pregnancy:

  • Resources to Stop Drinking Alcohol or Taking Drugs     English | Español

Other things to avoid: During your pregnancy include changing the litter box, lead, and overheating yourself. 

View the related information found within our guide, Planning a Healthy Pregnancy:

Depression and Anxiety

Depression during or after pregnancy can become serious if not treated. If you think you may have depression, talk to your doctor as soon as possible, even if it’s before your next appointment.

View the related information found within our guide, Planning a Healthy Pregnancy:

Some symptoms can include: 

  • Being constantly worried
  • Feeling that something bad is going to happen
  • Racing thoughts that keep you up at night
  • Getting upset or angry easily
  • Feeling anxious or panicky
  • Having upset thoughts that can’t get out of your mind
If you’re pregnant and you have any of these signs, or if the signs get worse, call your doctor or Postpartum Support International Arizona Warmline at (800) 944-4773. You can also text Postpartum Support International by sending “HELP” to the number (800) 944-4773. There are things you and your provider can do to help you feel better. If you are worried about hurting yourself or your baby, call 911.

For a list of available Crisis Hotlines, please visit: https://www.azahcccs.gov/BehavioralHealth/crisis.html
 

Stages of Pregnancy

Pregnancy usually lasts 40 weeks or about nine months. Every three months are grouped into a trimester. There are three trimesters: First Trimester (weeks 1-13), Second Trimester (weeks 14-27), and Third Trimester (weeks 28-40).

To learn more about the different trimesters, view your B – UFC/ACC Prenatal Packet.

There is also a free service called text4baby that will send you three, free messages a week to guide you through your pregnancy and your baby’s first year. To sign up, text 'BABY' to 511411 or visit https://www.text4baby.org/SignUp.


Preparing for Your Baby and Childbirth

Childbirth and Childbirth Classes

As your due date gets closer, it’s a good idea to sign up for childbirth education available at most hospitals. Take this time to prepare yourself as much as possible about childbirth and becoming a new parent.

It is best to let labor start on its own and allow your baby to grow and develop the full 40 weeks of pregnancy. While being done with pregnancy may seem tempting, especially during those last few weeks, inducing labor is associated with increased risks, including prematurity, a cesarean section, hemorrhage and infection.

Induction of labor or a cesarean section should only be scheduled before 39 weeks for medical reasons—not for convenience or scheduling concerns. If your doctor is worried about the health of your baby, an induction or cesarean section may still be the best option.

For more information, speak with your healthcare provider, visit www.marchofdimes.org or contact the B – UFC Maternal Child Health Department to speak with an OB Case Manager.

View the related information found within our guide, Planning a Healthy Pregnancy:


Choosing a Pediatrician for Your Baby

This is a good time to choose your baby’s pediatrician. Ask your doctor for a recommendation, or you can call B – UFC/ACC’s Customer Care Center at (800) 582-8686, TTY 711 to get help choosing a pediatrician, setting up an appointment, and arranging a ride.

Feeding Your Baby

Decide how you would like to feed your baby. Breastfeeding and bottle feeding have different benefits to help you and your family bond. 

If You Choose Breastfeeding

Did you know that your health plan can provide you a free breast pump? You can call B – UFC/ACC’s Customer Care Center at (800) 582-8686, TTY 711 to get more information. 

Your local WIC (Women, Infants, and Children) office has Lactation Consultants that are available to help with breastfeeding questions and problems. They offer a 24/7 breastfeeding support hotline as well as free breastfeeding classes to help support your breastfeeding goals (800) 2525-WIC. WIC can also assist in covering the cost of formula if you choose to bottle feed your baby.


Postpartum

After the birth of your baby, your body will recover from delivery. Plan to take it easy, sleep when the baby sleeps, and ask for help when you need it. Some normal changes after delivery are:

  • Vaginal discharge called lochia (LOH-kee-uh). It is the tissue and blood that lined your uterus during pregnancy. It is heavy and bright red at first, becoming lighter in flow and color until it goes away after a few weeks.
  • Swelling in your legs and feet. Keep your feet elevated when possible.
  • Difficulty having a bowel movement. Try to drink plenty of water and eat fresh fruits and vegetables.
  • Menstrual-like cramping is common, especially if you are breastfeeding.
  • Your breast milk will come in within two to four days after your delivery. Even if you are not breastfeeding, you can have milk leaking from your nipples, and your breasts might feel full, tender, or uncomfortable.

To learn more about when you should call your doctor after you deliver, please view our Postpartum Guide:


Visiting Your Doctor 

Your doctor will want to see you after delivery, usually between two and six weeks or sooner if you delivered by cesarean section. This appointment is very important. Your doctor will make sure you have recovered after your delivery and will also talk to you about your birth control options. Ask your doctor when you should follow-up after delivery. 

Your baby will have frequent appointments with their pediatrician in the first two years of their lives. Well child checks are a covered benefit for your baby and are usually scheduled 2-3 days after birth, 1 month, 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, 9 months, 1 year, 18 months, and 2 years of age. After 2, well child checks are usually scheduled yearly. 

If you need help choosing a doctor, scheduling an appointment, or getting a ride please call our Customer Care Center at (800) 582-8686, TTY 711.

For information related to well child checks, please view our Postpartum Guide:

Postpartum Depression

After childbirth, you may feel sad, weepy, and overwhelmed for a few days. Many new mothers have the “baby blues” after giving birth. Changing hormones, anxiety about caring for the baby, and lack of sleep all affect your emotions. 

Be patient with yourself. These feelings are normal and usually go away quickly. However, if sadness lasts more than two weeks, go see your doctor. Don’t wait until your postpartum visit to do so. You might have a serious but treatable condition called postpartum depression. Postpartum depression can happen any time within the first year after birth

If you have any of these signs, or if the signs get worse, call your doctor or Postpartum Support International Arizona Warmline at (800) 944-4773. There are things you and your provider can do to help you feel better. If you are worried about hurting yourself or your baby, call 911.

For a list of available crisis assistance in your area, please visit: https://www.azahcccs.gov/BehavioralHealth/crisis.html

Loss of Pregnancy or Newborn

We, at Banner – University Family Care, are here to support our members who have experienced a pregnancy loss or a loss of a newborn. We are very sorry to hear about the loss of your baby and want to ensure we provide you with resources available to you for support after suffering this kind of loss. 

Please visit the March of Dimes site here to view available resources for you: https://www.marchofdimes.org/complications/loss-and-grief.aspx

You may also call our Customer Care Center at (800) 582-8686, TTY 711, to ask for a referral to speak to one of our nurse care managers for more support. 

We truly are sorry for your loss and we wish you the very best always.