Maternal and Child Health Services

The Banner – University Family Care/AHCCCS Complete Care (B – UFC/ACC) offers a wide variety of services and resources to help our maternity and pediatric members navigate their health care. We want you and your children to be as healthy as possible. The information below outlines services like Well-Women’s Preventative Care, Healthy Pregnancies, Prenatal Care, Postpartum Care and more. Plus, information on both well-childcare and other pediatric health care programs.  

We are available Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. We can help you find a primary care provider or specialty care doctor, help make needed appointments, and arrange a ride to your medical appointments. We can also connect you with a member of our Maternal Child Health team if you have questions. Care Managers are available to follow up with you about any of your or your child’s healthcare concerns. Please call our Customer Care Center at (800) 582-8686, TTY 711.


Pediatric Care Services

At B – UFC/ACC, we want to ensure you and your child are as healthy as possible. Please call our Customer Care Center at (800) 582-8686, TTY 711.

We are available Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. We can help you find a doctor, make an appointment, and arrange a ride to your medical appointments. We can also refer you to a member of our Maternal Child Health Department staff if you have questions or would like a nurse care manager to follow up with you.

EPSDT – Well Child Visits

It is important for your child to visit their doctor for, and Early Periodic Screen Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) visit which is also known as a Well Child Visit.

EPSDT visits are important for all infants, children, and young adults under 21. There are no charges or co-payments for EPSDT services or any related services for any child under the age of 21 on our health plan. 

Your child’s doctor will want to see your child for their wellness visits at: 

  • 3-5 days old

  • 1 month old

  • 2 months old

  • 4 months old

  • 6 months old

  • 9 months old

  • 12 months old

  • 15 months old

  • 18 months old

  • 2 years old (24 months)

  • 2 ½ years old (30 months) 

  • 3 years old and yearly after until 21 years old

There are many benefits to an EPSDT visit including: 

  • Prevention. Your child gets scheduled immunizations to prevent illness. You also can ask your pediatrician about nutrition and safety in the home and at school.

  • Tracking growth & development. See how much your child has grown in the time since your last visit and talk with your doctor about your child's development. You can discuss your child's milestones, social behaviors, and learning.

  • Raising any concerns. Make a list of topics you want to talk about with your child's pediatrician such as development, behavior, sleep, eating or getting along with other family members. 

  • Team approach: Your child’s doctor can also refer your child to any specialists that your child may need to help with their continued wellness. These referrals are covered by your health plan.

An EPSDT Visit includes: 

  • A comprehensive health and developmental history, including growth and development screening which includes physical, nutritional, and behavioral assessment.

  • Nutritional Assessment provided by a PCP. 

  • Behavioral Health Screening and services provided by a PCP.

  • Developmental Screening Tools used by a PCP. 

  • A comprehensive physical examination. 

  • Appropriate immunization according to age and health history.

  • Laboratory and x-ray tests include blood lead screening assessment and blood lead testing appropriate to age and risk. Blood lead testing is required for all children at 12 and 24 months of age. Blood lead testing is also needed for any 2 to 6-year-old child that has missed earlier tests or when medically needed.

  • Health education, counseling, and chronic disease self-management.

  • Appropriate oral health screening, intended to identify oral pathology, including tooth decay and/or oral lesions, and the application of fluoride varnish conducted by a physician, physician assistant or nurse practitioner.

  • Appropriate vision, hearing, and speech screenings.

  • TB testing as appropriate to age and risk.

EPSDT services also include:

  • Dental Benefits

  • Preventative Care

  • Fluoride Treatments

  • Dental X-rays

  • Sealants

  • Emergency Care

  • Regular Maintenance

  • Two professional teeth cleanings every year

  • Vision Services including eyeglasses

  • Hearing Services 

EPSDT Visits do not include services that are experimental, that are solely for cosmetic purposes, or that are not cost effective when compared to other interventions.

If you think something may be wrong between visits, call your baby’s provider. In many cases they can answer your questions over the phone. If not, they’ll make an appointment for you to bring your baby in for an office visit. Many of the things new parents worry about turn out to be minor problems.
If you need assistance with transportation to and from medical appointments, please reach out to our Customer Care Department at (800) 582-8686, TTY 711.

Vaccines

Serious disease is still out there. You may not see serious disease in your neighborhood, like your parents or grandparents did. We are protected from these diseases now because of vaccines, but these diseases do still exist. If we were to stop vaccinating, the diseases would return. Making the choice to vaccinate is making the choice to protect your child from vaccine preventable diseases.
The United States currently has the safest, most effective vaccine supply in its history. Before a vaccine is approved and given to children, it is tested extensively. Scientists and medical professionals carefully evaluate all the available information about the vaccine to determine its safety and effectiveness. As new information and science become available, vaccine recommendations are updated.
Your child may feel discomfort or tenderness where he or she got the shot, but this is minor compared to the serious complications that can result from the diseases these vaccines prevent. Nearly all children can be safely vaccinated. There are some exceptions, including children with allergies to something in a vaccine and those with weakened immune systems due to an illness or a medical treatment, such as chemotherapy.

For more information visit: https://whyimmunize.org/. You can access an up-to-date vaccine schedule.

Children’s Rehabilitative Services (CRS) Program

What is CRS?

Children’s Rehabilitative Services (CRS) is a designation given to AHCCCS members who have certain health conditions. CRS designated members get the same AHCCCS services as non-CRS members. They can get care from providers in the community like other members. They may also use special clinics called Multi-Specialty Interdisciplinary Clinics (MSIC). MSICs bring many specialty providers together in one location. They provide family-centered, coordinated care to meet the complex needs of children in the CRS program. MSIC locations and a list of available specialties at each clinic is on page 89. B – UFC/ACC helps CRS designated members with coordination and monitoring to make sure special healthcare needs are met. CRS eligibility is determined by the AHCCCS Division of Member Services (DMS).

Who is eligible for CRS?

AHCCCS members may be eligible for CRS designation when they are under 21 years old AND have a qualifying CRS condition. The medical condition must also:

  • Require active treatment; and 
  • Be found by AHCCCS Division of Member Services to meet criteria specified in Arizona law (ARS R9-22-1301-1305). 

A full list of eligible diagnosis can be found here.

A CRS application can be submitted by anyone such as a family member, health care worker, doctor, or health plan staff. Applications must include medical records that show a CRS qualifying condition and active treatment need exist. 

B – UFC/ACC is here to help children with CRS eligible conditions. If you have questions about the CRS Program, need help completing an application, or would like to speak to a member of our Pediatric Care Management team. For information, please call our Customer Care Center at (800) 582-8686, TTY 711. More CRS information is also available by contacting the AHCCCS CRS Enrollment Unit at: (602) 417-4545 or (855) 333-7828. Applications are available at www.azahcccs.gov.

Pediatric Care Management Services

Did you know that you have Registered Nurse Care Managers available to you and your child through your health plan? Your care manager can assist you in coordinating care for your child and assist you with: 

  • Learning about your child’s medical diagnosis.
  • Scheduling no-cost transportation to and from medical appointments. 
  • Talking to your child’s doctors to help advocate for your child’s need. 
  • Making sure you child has all their needed medications.
  • Refer you to community resources such as housing, home visitation programs, and nutrition assistance.
  • Help you schedule doctor’s appointments. 

We also have specialized programs to help you manage your child’s chronic diseases. One program available to our members is the Pediatric Asthma Program. If your child has been diagnosed with asthma and you would like more information on learning about asthma, asthma medications, or need help working with your doctor, this program would benefit you and your child. The pediatric nurse care manager will help you by: 

  • Providing you education on asthma and taking care of a child with asthma. 
  • Making sure your child has all their needed medications and teaching you the proper way to use them. 
  • Making sure your child has an asthma action plan.
  • Talking to you about asthma triggers and ways to avoid those triggers.
  • Learning about your child’s care team and ways to make sure everyone on your child’s care team is aware of your child’s medical needs.

If you would like to speak to a pediatric nurse case manager, please call our Customer Care department at (800) 582-8686, TTY 711 and request for a referral to be sent to the Maternal Child Health department. 


 


Well-Women's Preventative Care

We encourage our female members to get regular preventative care services. Well-Women’s Preventative Care services and other preventative care and screening services are available without copayment or cost-sharing. An Annual Well-Woman Preventative Care visit will help identify health problems and promote healthy lifestyle habits that reduce the risks of some health problems. These Well-Women Preventative services include, but are not limited to: 

  • A physical wellness exam that assesses overall health
  • Clinical breast exams and mammograms
  • Pelvic Exams, cervical cancer screening including pap smear.
  • Immunization including the availability of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine as recommended by the CDC and your provider.
  • Testing as appropriate for your age and risk factors. 
  • Initiating referrals for further testing, care and treatment if needed

Additional screenings and counseling which focus on minimizing health risks and maintaining a healthy lifestyle may include topics such as:

  • Nutrition, physical activity and elevated body mass index as an indicator of possible obesity.
  • Tobacco and substance use, abuse and dependency.
  • Depression screening.
  • Interpersonal and domestic violence.
  • Sexually transmitted infections and HIV.
  • Colorectal cancer screenings.
  • Family Planning Services and Supplies.
  • Preconception counseling with discussion about a healthy lifestyle before and between pregnancies, which includes (Reproductive history and sexual practices).
  • Healthy weight; diet, nutrition & folic acid intake, and the use of nutritional supplements.
  • Physical activity or exercise.
  • Oral Health Care.
  • Chronic disease management.
  • Emotional wellness.
  • Tobacco, substance (caffeine, alcohol, marijuana and other drugs), including prescription drug use.
  • Recommended intervals between pregnancies.

Call our Customer Care Department at (800) 582-8686, TTY 711 if you need help finding a doctor or if you need assistance in scheduling free transportation to and from your medical appointments. 


Preventative and Well Care Services

Female members have direct access to preventative and well care services from a Primary Care Provider or a Gynecologist within the Contractor’s network without the need for a referral.
Maternity care services include, but are not limited to:

  • Identification of pregnancy
  • Medically necessary prenatal services
  • Treatment of pregnancy related conditions
  • Labor and delivery services
  • Postpartum care
  • Related services such as outreach, education, and family planning services

A Healthy Pregnancy

From all of us at Banner – University Family Care/AHCCCS Complete Care (B – UFC/ACC), congratulations on your pregnancy!

This is an exciting time for you and your family. We want you and your baby to be as healthy as possible. Your baby is more likely to be healthy if you take care of yourself during your pregnancy. Please call our Customer Care Center at (800) 582-8686, TTY 711.

We are available Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. We can help you find a doctor, make an appointment, and arrange a ride to your medical appointments. We can also refer you to a member of our Maternal Child Health Department staff if you have questions or would like a nurse care manager to follow up with you throughout your pregnancy.

A healthy pregnancy starts with you...

The best things you can do to help you take care of you and your baby during your pregnancy are:

  • Seeing your doctor as soon as you think you are pregnant.
  • Going to all of your medical appointments.
  • Taking a prenatal vitamin every day.
  • Getting enough rest.
  • Eating healthy and exercising.
  • Taking care of your mental health.
  • Taking medications your doctor says are safe to take while pregnant.
  • Don’t smoke, drink alcohol, or take any drugs unless prescribed by your doctor.

Visiting Your Doctor

Schedule an appointment with your doctor as early as possible if you think you are pregnant. If you need help choosing a doctor, scheduling an appointment, or getting a ride, please call our Customer Care Center at (800) 582-8686, TTY 711.

View the related information found within our guide, Planning a Healthy Pregnancy:

Nutrition and Exercise

Having good nutrition and staying hydrated can make sure you and your baby are healthy. Your local WIC office can help you and your family with choosing healthy food, provide breastfeeding help, and have a nutrition expert available to answer your questions.

Call WIC at (800) 252-5942 to get started! You can also visit MyPlate.gov for more information on nutrition.

Exercising during pregnancy has been shown to be extremely beneficial. Always talk to your doctor before beginning any exercise program. 

View the related information found within our guide, Planning a Healthy Pregnancy:

Things to Avoid During Pregnancy

Alcohol: No amount of alcohol is considered safe to drink during pregnancy. It’s best not to drink any alcohol while pregnant. If you need help to stop drinking alcohol, talk to your doctor. Or call the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) national helpline at (800) 662-4357.

View the related information found within our guide, Planning a Healthy Pregnancy:

  • Resources to Stop Drinking Alcohol or Taking Drugs     English | Español

Smoking: If you smoke, having a baby might be the motivation you need to quit. Talk to your doctor about quitting or call ASHLine, a free service available to help you quit smoking, at 1-800-55-66-222. You can also text “NO SMOKE” to 74097 to enroll with ASHline.

Recreational Drugs: Pregnant women who use opioids or other non-prescribed drugs may be placing their unborn babies at risk for premature birth, poor growth, birth defects, and behavior and learning problems. If you need help to stop using recreational drugs, talk to your doctor. Or call the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) national helpline at (800) 662-4357.

View the related information found within our guide, Planning a Healthy Pregnancy:

  • Resources to Stop Drinking Alcohol or Taking Drugs     English | Español

Other things to avoid: During your pregnancy include changing the litter box, lead, and overheating yourself. 

View the related information found within our guide, Planning a Healthy Pregnancy:


Depression and Anxiety

Depression and Anxiety

Depression during or after pregnancy can become serious if not treated. If you think you may have depression, talk to your doctor as soon as possible, even if it’s before your next appointment.

View the related information found within our guide, Planning a Healthy Pregnancy:

Some symptoms can include: 

  • Being constantly worried
  • Feeling that something bad is going to happen
  • Racing thoughts that keep you up at night
  • Getting upset or angry easily
  • Feeling anxious or panicky
  • Having upset thoughts that can’t get out of your mind
If you’re pregnant and you have any of these signs, or if the signs get worse, call your doctor or Postpartum Support International Arizona Warmline at (800) 944-4773. You can also text Postpartum Support International by sending “HELP” to the number (800) 944-4773. There are things you and your provider can do to help you feel better. If you are worried about hurting yourself or your baby, call 911.

For a list of available Crisis Hotlines, please visit here.

Stages of Pregnancy

Pregnancy usually lasts 40 weeks or about nine months. Every three months are grouped into a trimester. There are three trimesters: First Trimester (weeks 1-13), Second Trimester (weeks 14-27), and Third Trimester (weeks 28-40).

To learn more about the different trimesters, view your B – UFC/ACC Prenatal Packet.

There is also a free service called text4baby that will send you three, free messages a week to guide you through your pregnancy and your baby’s first year. To sign up, text 'BABY' to 511411 or visit here.


Preparing for Your Baby and Childbirth

Childbirth and Childbirth Classes

As your due date gets closer, it’s a good idea to sign up for childbirth education available at most hospitals. Take this time to prepare yourself as much as possible about childbirth and becoming a new parent.

It is best to let labor start on its own and allow your baby to grow and develop the full 40 weeks of pregnancy. While being done with pregnancy may seem tempting, especially during those last few weeks, inducing labor is associated with increased risks, including prematurity, a cesarean section, hemorrhage and infection.

Induction of labor or a cesarean section should only be scheduled before 39 weeks for medical reasons—not for convenience or scheduling concerns. If your doctor is worried about the health of your baby, an induction or cesarean section may still be the best option.

For more information, speak with your healthcare provider, visit www.marchofdimes.org or contact the B – UFC Maternal Child Health Department to speak with an OB Case Manager.

View the related information found within our guide, Planning a Healthy Pregnancy:


Choosing a Pediatrician for Your Baby

This is a good time to choose your baby’s pediatrician. Ask your doctor for a recommendation, or you can call B – UFC/ACC’s Customer Care Center at (800) 582-8686, TTY 711 to get help choosing a pediatrician, setting up an appointment, and arranging a ride.

Feeding Your Baby

Decide how you would like to feed your baby. Breastfeeding and bottle feeding have different benefits to help you and your family bond. 

If You Choose Breastfeeding

Did you know that your health plan can provide you a free breast pump? You can call B – UFC/ACC’s Customer Care Center at (800) 582-8686, TTY 711 to get more information. 

Your local WIC (Women, Infants, and Children) office has Lactation Consultants that are available to help with breastfeeding questions and problems. They offer a 24/7 breastfeeding support hotline as well as free breastfeeding classes to help support your breastfeeding goals (800) 2525-WIC. WIC can also assist in covering the cost of formula if you choose to bottle feed your baby.


Postpartum

After the birth of your baby, your body will recover from delivery. Plan to take it easy, sleep when the baby sleeps, and ask for help when you need it. Some normal changes after delivery are:

  • Vaginal discharge called lochia (LOH-kee-uh). It is the tissue and blood that lined your uterus during pregnancy. It is heavy and bright red at first, becoming lighter in flow and color until it goes away after a few weeks.
  • Swelling in your legs and feet. Keep your feet elevated when possible.
  • Difficulty having a bowel movement. Try to drink plenty of water and eat fresh fruits and vegetables.
  • Menstrual-like cramping is common, especially if you are breastfeeding.
  • Your breast milk will come in within two to four days after your delivery. Even if you are not breastfeeding, you can have milk leaking from your nipples, and your breasts might feel full, tender, or uncomfortable.

To learn more about when you should call your doctor after you deliver, please view our Postpartum Guide:


Visiting Your Doctor 

Your doctor will want to see you after delivery, usually between two and six weeks or sooner if you delivered by cesarean section. This appointment is very important. Your doctor will make sure you have recovered after your delivery and will also talk to you about your birth control options. Ask your doctor when you should follow-up after delivery. 

Your baby will have frequent appointments with their pediatrician in the first 3 years of their lives. Well child checks are a covered benefit for your baby and are usually scheduled 2-3 days after birth, 1- month, 2-months, 4-months, 6-months, 9-months, 1-year, 18-months, 2- years, 30-months and 3-years of age. After 3, well child checks are usually scheduled yearly. 

If you need help choosing a doctor, scheduling an appointment, or getting a ride please call our Customer Care Center at (800) 582-8686, TTY 711.

For information related to well child checks, please view our Postpartum Guide:

Postpartum Depression

After childbirth, you may feel sad, weepy, and overwhelmed for a few days. Many new mothers have the “baby blues” after giving birth. Changing hormones, anxiety about caring for the baby, and lack of sleep all affect your emotions. 

Be patient with yourself. These feelings are normal and usually go away quickly. However, if sadness lasts more than two weeks, go see your doctor. Don’t wait until your postpartum visit to do so. You might have a serious but treatable condition called postpartum depression. Postpartum depression can happen any time within the first year after birth.

If you have any of these signs, or if the signs get worse, call your doctor or Postpartum Support International Arizona Warmline at (800) 944-4773. There are things you and your provider can do to help you feel better. If you are worried about hurting yourself or your baby, call 911.

For a list of available crisis assistance in your area, please visit here.

Loss of Pregnancy or Newborn

We, at Banner – University Family Care, are here to support our members who have experienced a pregnancy loss or a loss of a newborn. We are very sorry to hear about the loss of your baby and want to ensure we provide you with resources available to you for support after suffering this kind of loss. 

Please visit the March of Dimes site to view available resources here.

You may also call our Customer Care Center at (800) 582-8686, TTY 711, to ask for a referral to speak to one of our nurse care managers for more support. 

We truly are sorry for your loss, and we wish you the very best always.


MAT and SUD Services & Resources

Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) is the use of medications, in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies, to provide a “whole-patient” approach to the treatment of substance use disorders (SUDs) and prevent opioid overdose. A combination of medication and therapy can successfully treat these disorders, and for some people struggling with addiction, MAT can help sustain recovery. 

The directory below is being made available to support in identifying Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) services for our pregnant and postpartum members.

AHCCCS registered providers by Specialty

These are providers located in the state of Arizona, and these providers may or may not be contracted with all the AHCCCS Managed Care Organizations (MCOs).  Specialty listing of AHCCCS registered providers will appear and the provider’s Name, Specialty, Address and Phone number will be listed. Providers with multiple office locations will be listed under each location.


Community Resources

Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Program: The Arizona WIC program provides nutrition education, breastfeeding support services, supplemental nutritious foods, and referral to health and social services. This service is available to pregnant people and children under the age of 5 who financially qualify. Call WIC at (800) 2525-WIC (942) to get started. 

Arizona Health Start: For people who are pregnant or have a child under 2 years old.

If you are pregnant or a mother facing challenges, it’s important to know that someone can help you. Arizona Health Start is here to help. Our home visitors can connect you with a variety of community organizations that provide health care, education, parenting resources, and application assistance for other programs. We will get to know you and your family, so we can help you get the resources you need. We understand your culture because we live in your community. We also understand what you’re going through because we’ve helped families just like yours.

To find the representative for your county click here

Early Head Start/Head Start: For families with children under 5 years old.

Head Start (for children 3-5) and Early Head Start (pregnant people and children 0-3) has a variety of program and service delivery options including Center Base, Home-Base, Combination (Home & Center) or Family Child Care.  Each program incorporates an individualized approach to high-quality services for low-income pregnant people and children age birth to five. Families receive support and guidance from Head Start staff to become self-sufficient.

To find the representative for your county click here.

Healthy Families Arizona: For families with an infant under 3 months old.

Everyone who is having a baby can feel overwhelmed. It’s important to know that it’s ok to ask for help, especially if you’re experiencing a few challenges. Healthy Families Arizona is a free program that helps mothers and fathers become the best parents they can be. A Home Visitor will get to know you and connect you with services based on your specific situation.

To find the representative for your county click here

Nurse – Family Partnership: For first time mothers less than 28 weeks pregnant.

Children don’t come with an instructional guide. So, it’s only normal that new mothers face challenges and doubt. In times like these, someone is here to help you. Nurse-Family Partnership is a community healthcare program that will connect you with a nurse home visitor. Through the visits, you will learn how you can best care for your child.

To find the representative for your county click here.

Parents as Teachers: For families with a child on the way or under 5 years old.

Your children have so much potential. As a parent, you have a unique opportunity to be their first teacher. That’s because most brain development occurs in the first few years of life, and you can make a difference. Parents As Teachers will show you how. Our Home Visitors will provide you with resources appropriate for your child’s stage of development. Through Parents As Teachers, you’ll develop a stronger relationship with your child and help prepare them for academic success.

To find the representative for your county click here.

Family Spirit: For Native American families with children under 3 years old.

The Family Spirit Program is a culturally tailored home-visiting intervention delivered by Native American paraprofessionals as a core strategy to support young Native parents from pregnancy to 3 years post-partum. Parents gain knowledge and skills to achieve optimum development for their preschool age children across the domains of physical, cognitive, social-emotional, language learning, and self-help.

To find the representative for your county click here.

SafeCare: For families with a child under 5 years old.

Let professional and highly trained home visitors support you and your family on your journey to success. Utilizing the nationally recognized SafeCare model, you will receive weekly visits that are divided into core focus areas:  parent-child interaction, health, and home safety.  In each focus area or module, you will build on and strengthen your skills through a variety of interactive sessions.

To find the representative for your county click here.

Birth to Five Helpline

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Arizona Early Intervention Program (AZEIP): For children up to 36 months of age.

  • AZEIP providers support to families and children birth to three years of age with significant developmental delays. 
  • Call (844) 770-9500 to learn more. 

Raising Special Kids: Raising Special Kids exists to improve the lives of children in Arizona with a full range of disabilities, from birth to age 26, by providing support, training, information, and individual assistance so families can become effective advocates for their children.

Visit https://raisingspecialkids.org/ or call (800) 237-3007 for more information. 

Starting Out Right: Starting Out Right provides free pregnancy and parenting education, that's meant for those 21 and under. Our instructors will help you make sense of what is happening to your body during pregnancy and prepare you to become a good parent to your baby. You will learn skills to help you make the best choices during your pregnancy, during delivery, and after your baby is born.

To learn more, click here.

Safe Kids: Safe Kids Worldwide® is a nonprofit organization working to help families and communities keep kids safe from injuries. Most people are surprised to learn preventable injuries are the #1 killer of kids in the United States. Throughout the world, almost one million children die of an injury each year, and almost every one of these tragedies is preventable.

For more information click here.